The Spirits of Long Meadow Brook

The Spirits of Long Meadow Brook

People often ask me this question: Aren’t you afraid of hiking alone? My response is that I’m more afraid to walk down Main Street than through the woods, the reason being that it’s a rare occasion I encounter another mammal. Oh, I do move more cautiously when I’m alone and today was no different. But . . . there’s something uniquely special about a solo experience.

Looking Back on 2018

In order from left to right, Dakota Ward, Aidan Black, & Alice Bragg

In order from left to right, Dakota Ward, Aidan Black, & Alice Bragg

Meet the Staff

Aidan Black, Associate Director— Interning at the GLLT in 2016 under Tom Henderson’s guidance and mentorship sparked a passion for conservation work. I grew up spending summers on Keyes Pond and visiting my grandparents’ farm in Sweden, ME. In May, I graduated from Colby College with a BA in Environmental Policy. In my free time, I enjoy hiking, kayaking, and playing soccer—which led me to coaching the Fryeburg Academy boys’ Soccer Team this fall.

Dakota Ward, Stewardship and Systems Associate—I grew up on the Cold River in Stow. I was an intern at the GLLT in 2017 under the mentorship of Tom Henderson, Leigh Hayes and others, and returned for 2018. I graduated from Central Maine Community College with an AAS degree in Graphic Design and where, in addition to my GLLT duties, I’m now an instructor. I enjoy hiking, photography, and mountain biking.

Alice Bragg, Office Manager—I have always loved Maine and moved to Lovell from Massachusetts in 1980, looking for a rural setting to make a home and raise a family. I started doing work for the GLLT in 2005 and joined the team last winter. My favorite pastimes are spending time with my family, hiking, kayaking, cross-country skiing and gardening.

Please stop by the office if you have questions, comments, or just to say, “Hello!”

Page 3-view from Flat Hill (10_26_18).jpg

The GLLT is supported by a great team of volunteers, and this year the hard work of these amazing people was felt more than ever.

Thursday Volunteer Outings was a summer feature at GLLT properties. We worked on trails, opened scenic views, and made needed repairs. The two-hour work sessions required hand tools, good attitudes, teamwork, and sometimes brawn to complete key projects.

Off the trails, we have worked on monitoring and mapping conservation easements. This has given us the opportunity to introduce ourselves to the conservation-minded landowners who have easements with the GLLT. Our first summer outing was to Chip Stockford Reserve, where we re-opened the beautiful view of Kezar Fen and Mt. Kearsarge. Next, we built Tom’s Path—in honor of our late Executive Director, Tom Henderson—at Five Kezar Ponds Reserve. Tom’s Path takes hikers on a wonderful excursion from the Mountain Trail to scenic vistas overlooking Middle Pond. At the Heald and Bradley Ponds Reserve, we rerouted the Flat Hill trail and opened a view of the White Mountains at the summit— on a clear day you can now see all the way to Mt. Washington! In addition, with the help of many volunteers over several outings, we created the Heritage Trail. The trail connects the Amos Andrews and Saddle trails, taking hikers along old stone walls, a colonial road, and several fascinating geological features along the south side of Amos Mountain. And for those who like to climb the Southwest View Trail, there is now a view of Kezar’s Upper Bay from the top of Devil’s Staircase. None of this work could have been completed without dedicated volunteers: GLLT board members Bob Katz, Brent Legere, Mike Maguire, Bruce Taylor, Heinrich Wurm, and significant contributions from Ken Angell, Ken Einstein, Ingrid Einstein, Jane Gibbons, Jay Gestwicki, Lila Gestwicki, Tim Gestwicki, Brian Hammond, Kevin Harding, Leigh Macmillen Hayes, Rick Klausner, Dave Percival, Anna Römer, Peter Ross, and Ryan Schutt.

GLLT trails are open year-round so strap on your snowshoes or skis and enjoy the views from the summits, and join us when we resume our volunteer outings in the spring!

Book of December: Rewilding Our Hearts

Book of December: Rewilding Our Hearts

Wrote Kevin, “I rarely find a book that I’m willing to recommend to friends and colleagues. I rarely read books on saving the environment because I find them too depressing. I am guilty of feeling totally overwhelmed by the chaos and daily news of political disfunction that makes any kind of progress toward “saving the environment” seem impossible. Despite these feelings, I would like you to consider reading Rewilding Our Hearts by Marc Bekoff. No doubt many of you know this author and you may have already read some of his work. Bekoff can help us understand that the work we do in Lovell is in fact meaningful and productive.

2018 Marion Rodgerson Scholarship Award and Internship Program

2018 Marion Rodgerson Scholarship Award and Internship Program

In honor of one of our earliest easement donors, Marion Rodgerson, the Greater Lovell Land Trust offers a $1,000 scholarship each year to a graduating senior at Fryeburg Academy. We are pleased to announce that this year’s recipient of the Marion Rodgerson Scholarship, as selected by a team of teachers and staff, is Isaiah Voter of South Chatham, New Hampshire. Isaiah is currently a freshman at Unity College in Maine, where he is studying forestry ecology.

Nothing to Grouse About

Nothing to Grouse About

A week ago I shared a unique experience with five other naturalists, the majority of them in the six to eleven age range. For twenty minutes the six of us watched a Ruffed Grouse at it moved about, overturning leaves and foraging on buds. When we last saw it, the bird headed off in the opposite direction that we intended to journey, and so we moved on with wonder in our eyes and minds.

Childhood Magic

Childhood Magic

Why did the Greater Lovell Land Trust co-host (or rather tri-host) a hike through Pondicherry Park in Bridgton this morning? Because it’s hunting season, and it didn’t make sense to invite the public on a property that isn’t posted. (Not that we don’t still tramp on GLLT properties in November, mind you, but not on a public walk necessarily.)

Election Day Tramp

 Election Day Tramp

It always strikes me that no matter how often one travels on or off a trail, there’s always something different that makes itself known–thus the wonder of a wander.

And so it was when Pam Marshall, a member of the Greater Lovell Land Trust, joined me for a tramp at the John A. Segur Wildlife Refuge East on Farrington Pond Road this morning. She had no idea what to expect. Nor did I.

Bishop Cardinal Reserve: Where (Wo)Man and Nature Intersect

Bishop Cardinal Reserve: Where (Wo)Man and Nature Intersect

Perhaps we should have tiptoed and tried to silently pass through the woods much the way a fox or bear might, but that is not our habit. And so on today’s Tuesday Tramp for the Greater Lovell Land Trust, we chatted and wondered aloud as we hiked along the  trails of Bishop Cardinal Reserve on the upper side of Horseshoe Pond Road in Lovell. Consequently, our wild mammal sightings were non-existent. Despite that, we saw soooo much…

What the Tree Spirit Knows

What the Tree Spirit Knows

Yesterday, I’d climbed the Flat Hill Trail at the Heald and Bradley Ponds Reserve to take another photo for the newsletter–that one of the view from the summit of snow falling in the White Mountains. This past summer, staff and volunteers of the land trust had made some trail changes and opened several views, the one from Flat Hill being the most dramatic and the foliage, snow and sky enhanced the opening. But . . . today’s view was different and I knew I needed to capture it again.

Cranberry Gathering with MESA(Maine Environmental Science Academy)

Cranberry Gathering with MESA(Maine Environmental Science Academy)

A fine day spent with the MESA (Maine Environmental Science Academy) students, a rigorous, ecology-based experiential learning class for 6-8 graders at Molly Ockett Middle School in Fryeburg. We shared some info about fen and kettle basin ecology and then spent the rest of the time picking cranberries and being wowed by their knowledge, camaraderie, and eagerness to learn.